Pam Bradow was driving through an intersection when another driver ran a stop sign, drove across three lanes of traffic and a median and hit Bradow, almost sandwiching her car and giving her whiplash and a concussion.

While living in Colorado Springs, Colo., as a dental hygienist, Bradow’s massage therapist recommended cryotherapy, which exposes a person to freezing temperatures in a short amount of time to shock the body into recovery. Bradow, who was already dealing with general inflammation, got massages, saw a concussion specialist and still felt she needed help.

Bradow gave it a try.

“I noticed that night that I felt better and more alive in my body and not constricted or confined as muscles tense up,” she said. “It just helped me get through treatments faster.”

With those strides in her recovery, Bradow wanted to get more involved and help others with her newfound methods.

Bradow, who is from Fergus Falls, Minn., moved to North Dakota and started up Glacial Peaks Cryotherapy at 3139 Bluestem Drive #116 and is open from about 8-9 a.m. to about 6-7 p.m. weekdays and 8-9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays.

With four other employees, Glacial Peak provides whole-body cryotherapy, compression recovery and local and facial cryotherapy services.

Bradow, the owner, started dreaming about this last November and opened her doors on Aug. 22. She’s feels things have gone well, though some days have gone smoother than others.

“The rest is just hard work, sweat, tears and laughter,” Bradow said. “I love helping people, and I’ve noticed we’re getting older as a community. We’re living longer, so we need more avenues to use to help our bodies run more efficiently.”

To use the facility, customers are asked to sign waivers, then undress and put on company socks, underwear, gloves and slippers before the therapy. They then stand in the cryosauna, a device that looks like a tanning booth except it uses liquid nitrogen and is chilled down to -170 degrees and goes down to about -250 after entry. Temperatures in the chamber range from about -140 to -320 degrees. Using a temperature gun for measurement, the target range of skin temperature is about 50 to 30 degrees.

“We know what cold is like in North Dakota, but not this cold,” Bradow said.

With skin exposure to the cold for about two minutes, those temperatures trick the brain into a fight or flight response, triggering the brain to rush the body’s blood to its heart and core to give the lungs more oxygen, thus enriching the blood with more oxygen. That causes more nutrients to go into the blood and go to ailing parts of the body or where pain may be. Someone from Glacial Peak watches out to make sure customers are alright because everyone reacts different depending on the anxiety of newcomers and the physical issues people deal with.

“It’s able to attack the inflammation or arthritis,” manager Ileah Sylvester said. She admitted that although cryotherapy is not a medical service, studies have shown it helps certain conditions.

Some people may notice tingling afterward, Bradow said, but most people feel the full effects the next morning.

“If it’s in that temperature range, then we know you got that therapeutic effect,” said Sylvester, who has a degree in health information management. “It’s basically like a glorified ice bath, except we can get you colder than what an ice bath can get you. It can help with muscle recovery, any inflammation, any strains and helps with muscle relaxation.”

Bradow said some athletes use this type of therapy, and Sylvester added that a customer used facial treatment and saw improvement in acne and skin condition.

Bradow’s niece, who also worked at Glacial Peak, is 18 years old and had a third ACL surgery. She used cryotherapy to bring down inflammation in her knee.

“The first time I tried it, I was nervous obviously because I didn’t know what to expect, but I really love it” Sylvester said. “It definitely does help and is worth it to try it out.”

Pam Bradow was driving through an intersection when another driver ran a stop sign, drove across three lanes of traffic and a median and hit Bradow, almost sandwiching her car and giving her whiplash and a concussion.

While living in Colorado Springs, Colo., as a dental hygienist, Bradow’s massage therapist recommended cryotherapy, which exposes a person to freezing temperatures in a short amount of time to shock the body into recovery. Bradow, who was already dealing with general inflammation, got massages, saw a concussion specialist and still felt she needed help.

Bradow gave it a try.

“I noticed that night that I felt better and more alive in my body and not constricted or confined as muscles tense up,” she said. “It just helped me get through treatments faster.”

With those strides in her recovery, Bradow wanted to get more involved and help others with her newfound methods.

Bradow, who is from Fergus Falls, Minn., moved to North Dakota and started up Glacial Peaks Cryotherapy at 3139 Bluestem Drive #116 and is open from about 8-9 a.m. to about 6-7 p.m. weekdays and 8-9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays.

With four other employees, Glacial Peak provides whole-body cryotherapy, compression recovery and local and facial cryotherapy services.

Bradow, the owner, started dreaming about this last November and opened her doors on Aug. 22. She’s feels things have gone well, though some days have gone smoother than others.

“The rest is just hard work, sweat, tears and laughter,” Bradow said. “I love helping people, and I’ve noticed we’re getting older as a community. We’re living longer, so we need more avenues to use to help our bodies run more efficiently.”

To use the facility, customers are asked to sign waivers, then undress and put on company socks, underwear, gloves and slippers before the therapy. They then stand in the cryosauna, a device that looks like a tanning booth except it uses liquid nitrogen and is chilled down to -170 degrees and goes down to about -250 after entry. Temperatures in the chamber range from about -140 to -320 degrees. Using a temperature gun for measurement, the target range of skin temperature is about 50 to 30 degrees.

“We know what cold is like in North Dakota, but not this cold,” Bradow said.

With skin exposure to the cold for about two minutes, those temperatures trick the brain into a fight or flight response, triggering the brain to rush the body’s blood to its heart and core to give the lungs more oxygen, thus enriching the blood with more oxygen. That causes more nutrients to go into the blood and go to ailing parts of the body or where pain may be. Someone from Glacial Peak watches out to make sure customers are alright because everyone reacts different depending on the anxiety of newcomers and the physical issues people deal with.

“It’s able to attack the inflammation or arthritis,” manager Ileah Sylvester said. She admitted that although cryotherapy is not a medical service, studies have shown it helps certain conditions.

Some people may notice tingling afterward, Bradow said, but most people feel the full effects the next morning.

“If it’s in that temperature range, then we know you got that therapeutic effect,” said Sylvester, who has a degree in health information management. “It’s basically like a glorified ice bath, except we can get you colder than what an ice bath can get you. It can help with muscle recovery, any inflammation, any strains and helps with muscle relaxation.”

Bradow said some athletes use this type of therapy, and Sylvester added that a customer used facial treatment and saw improvement in acne and skin condition.

Bradow’s niece, who also worked at Glacial Peak, is 18 years old and had a third ACL surgery. She used cryotherapy to bring down inflammation in her knee.

“The first time I tried it, I was nervous obviously because I didn’t know what to expect, but I really love it” Sylvester said. “It definitely does help and is worth it to try it out.”